Who invented the electronic cigarette?

The history of electronic cigarette goes back a long time in history. Today there are still uncertainties about their patents and creators.

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In 1963, Herbert Gilbert patented "a cigarette without tobacco and without smoke". In his Gilbert patent he described how his device worked, for "replacement of burning tobacco and paper with flavored, hot, humid air." The Gilbert Device does not involve nicotine, and smokers of the Gilbert device enjoyed a flavored steam. Attempts to commercialize Gilbert's invention failed and his product was forgotten. However, it deserves a mention as the first patent for an electronic cigarette.

Most well-known is the invention of the Chinese pharmacist Hon Lik, who patented the first nicotine-based electronic cigarette in 2003. The following year, Hon Lik was the first person to manufacture and sell that product, for the first time in The Chinese market and then internationally.

The Chinese inventor who invented electronic cigarette in a nicotine-induced view, says that despite his worldwide popularity, imitation versions and legal disputes mean he has struggled to get out Benefit of its creation.

"Smoking is the least healthy in people's daily lives .... I have made a great contribution to society," said the 57-year-old Honorable Lik in a small office in Beijing while sending the Air gulps of steam. "But I do not live like a rich person, because of all the problems that our company has faced." Hon, a soft-spoken man from northwest China, is co- Founder of Ruyan, a company that has produced electronic cigarettes and cigars - from 68 yuan ($ 11 USD, € 8) - for more than a decade.

Their patents are set to be sold in a $ 75 million deal with Imperial Tobacco of Great Britain, but Hon. Says it will see very little of the bonanza, and that the years of copyright disputes And negative publicity have eroded their profits.
Their battles highlight rising competition in a market that soared to $ 2 billion in global sales, according to research firm Euromonitor International.

 

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